2 Comments

Connecticut hit with recruiting violations

The Huskies have been penalized due to improper phone calls, texts, and benefits to a recruit. NCAA investigators said UConn’s staff made hundreds of improper calls and text messages to recruits, gave recruits improper benefits, and improperly distributed free tickets to high school coaches and others.

The penalties imposed by the NCAA include:

  • Suspending Head Coach Jim Calhoun for three Big East games
  • Placing the program on three years probation
  • Reducing scholarships from 13 to 12 for the next three years
  • Limiting Connecticut to five official paid recruiting visits for the 2011-12 and 2012-13 academic years
  • Placing a two-year show-cause penalty on former UConn assistant Beau Archibald
  • Forcing UConn to distance themselves from former manager-turned-agent Josh Nochimson

The NCAA investigation centered around former UConn player Nate Miles who was kicked off the basketball team due to violating a restraining order. He reportedly received lodging, transportation, meals, and representation from Nochimson. UConn self-imposed penalties last fall in response to an NCAA notice of allegations that dealt with eight major recruiting violations within the men’s basketball program. Those included a reduction in scholarships and the program cutting ties with Archibald and fellow assistant Patrick Sellers.

2 comments on “Connecticut hit with recruiting violations

  1. I feel Calhoun got off relatively unscathed. Compared to Bruce Pearl’s penalties, the Calhoun verdict is a Sunday stroll. Pearl committed a secondary violation, lied about it, then confessed. Calhoun committed a major violation, wasn’t completely honest about it (reference Doug Gotlieb on Colin Cowherd), and is hit with a less severe sentence. Seems to me the NCAA is more interested in protecting its legends than enforcing rules.

    Check out my blog on a similar issue, the Bruce Pearl suspension.
    I feel Calhoun got off relatively unscathed. Compared to Bruce Pearl’s penalties, the Calhoun verdict is a Sunday stroll. Pearl committed a secondary violation, lied about it, then confessed. Calhoun committed a major violation, wasn’t completely honest about it (reference Doug Gotlieb on Colin Cowherd), and is hit with a less severe sentence. Seems to me the NCAA is more interested in protecting its legends than enforcing rules.

    Check out my blog on a similar issue, the Bruce Pearl suspension.
    http://mark-alewine.blogspot.com/2011/02/ego-money.html

  2. I agree Mark, however, I think both programs should have been penalized a lot worse. When you straight up lie to the NCAA there needs to be some serious punishment because if you don’t then why would you be honest? In the unlikely event that you get caught lying little will happen to you. The NCAA sent out a weak message in my opinion.

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